Catching HTTP OPTIONS /* request in a Rails app

Apache sometimes seems to send an HTTP “OPTIONS /*” request to Rails apps deployed under Apache Passenger.  (Or is it “OPTIONS *”? Not entirely sure). With User-Agent of “Apache/2.2.3 (CentOS) (internal dummy connection)”.

Apache does doc that this happens sometimes, although I don’t understand it.

I’ve been trying to take my Rails error logs more seriously to make sure I handle any bugs revealed. 404’s can indicate a problem, especially when the referrer is my app itself. So I wanted to get all of those 404’s for Apache’s internal dummy connection out of my log.  (How I managed to fight with Rails logs enough to actually get useful contextual information on FATAL errors is an entirely different complicated story for another time).

How can I make a Rails app handle them?

Well, first, let’s do a standards check and see that RFC 2616 HTTP 1.1 Section 9 (I hope I have a current RFC that hasn’t been superseded) says:

If the Request-URI is an asterisk (“*”), the OPTIONS request is intended to apply to the server in general rather than to a specific resource. Since a server’s communication options typically depend on the resource, the “*” request is only useful as a “ping” or “no-op” type of method; it does nothing beyond allowing the client to test the capabilities of the server. For example, this can be used to test a proxy for HTTP/1.1 compliance (or lack thereof).

Okay, sounds like we can basically reply with whatever we want to this request, it’s a “ping or no-op”.  How about a 200 text/plain with “OK\n”?

Here’s a line I added to my Rails routes.rb file that seems to catch the “*” requests and just respond with such a 200 OK.

  match ':asterisk', via: [:options], 
     constraints: { asterisk: /\*/ }, 
     to:  lambda {|env| [200, {'Content-Type' => 'text/plain'}, ["OK\n"]]}


Since “*” is a special glob character to Rails routing, looks like you have to do that weird constraints trick to actually match it. (Thanks to mbklein, this does not seem to be documented and I never would have figured it out on my own).

And then we can use a little “Rack app implemented in a lambda” trick to just return a 200 OK right from the routing file, without actually having to write a controller action somewhere else just to do this.

I have not yet tested this extensively, but I think it works? (Still worried if Apache is really requesting “OPTIONS *” instead of “OPTIONS /*” it might not be. Stay tuned.)

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One Response to Catching HTTP OPTIONS /* request in a Rails app

  1. Ross says:

    Thank you! I could not figure out how to catch “asterisk” routes in my routing file and your post saved the day.

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