On open source, consensus, vision, and scope

Around minute 27 of Building Rails ActionDispatch::SystemTestCase Framework from Eileen Uchitelle.

What is unique to open source is that the stakeholders you are trying to find consensus with have varying levels of investment in the end result…

…but I wasn’t prepared for all the other people who would care. Of course caring is good, I got a lot of productive and honest feedback from community members, but it’s still really overwhelming to feel like I needed to debate — everyone.

Rails ideologies of simplicity differ a lot from capybara’s ideology of lots of features. And all the individuals who were interested in the feature had differing opinions as well… I struggled with how to respect everyone’s opinions while building system tests, but also maintaining my sense of ownership.

I new that if I tried to please all groups and build systems tests by consensus, then I would end up pleasing no one. Everyone would end up unhappy because consensus is the enemy of vision. Sure, you end up adding everything everyone wants, but the feature will lose focus, and the code will lose style, and I will lose everything that I felt like was important.

I needed to figure out a way to respect everyone’s opinions without making systems tests a hodepodge of idoelogies of feeling like I threw out everything I cared about. I had to remind ourselves that we all had one goal: to integrate systems testing into rails. Even if we disagreed about the implementation, htis was our common ground.

With this in mind, there are a few ways you can keep your sanity when dealing with multiple ideologies in the open source world. One of the biggest things is to manage expectations. In open source there are no contracts, you can’t hold anyone else acountable (except for yourself) and nobody else is going to hold you accountable either… You are the person who has to own the scope, and you are the person who has to say ‘no’. There were a ton of extra features suggested for systems tests that I would love to see, but if I had implemented all of them it still wouldn’t be in rails today. I had to manage the scope and the expectations of everyone involved to keep the project in budget…

…When you are building open source features, you are building something for others. If you are open to suggestions the feature might change for the better. Even if you don’t agree, you have to be open to listening to the other side of things. It’s really easy to get cagey about the code that you’ve worked so hard to write. I still have to fight the urge to be really protective of systems test code… but I also have to remember that it’s no longer mine, and never was mine, it now belongs to everyone that uses Rails….

I new that if I tried to please all groups and build systems tests by consensus, then I would end up pleasing no one. Everyone would end up unhappy because consensus is the enemy of vision. Sure, you end up adding everything everyone wants, but the feature will lose focus, and the code will lose style…

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