rubyland infrastruture, and a modest sponsorship from honeybadger

Rubyland.news is my hobby project ruby RSS/atom feed aggregator.

Previously it was run on entirely free heroku resources — free dyno, free postgres (limited to 10K rows, which dashes my dreams of a searchable archive, oh well). The only thing I had to pay for was the domain. Rubyland doesn’t take many resources because it is mostly relatively ‘static’ and cacheable content, so could get by fine on one dyno. (I’m caching whole pages with Rails “fragment” caching and an in-process memory-based store, not quite how Rails fragment caching was intended to be used, but works out pretty well for this simple use case, with no additional resources required).

But the heroku free dyno doesn’t allow SSL on a custom hostname.  It’s actually pretty amazing what one can accomplish with ‘free tier’ resources from various cloud providers these days.  (I also use a free tier mailgun account for an MX server to receive @rubyland.news emails, and SMTP server for sending admin notifications from the app. And free DNS from cloudflare).  Yeah, for the limited resources rubyland needs, a very cheap DigitalOcean droplet would also work — but just as I’m not willing to spend much money on this hobby project, I’m also not willing to spend any more ‘sysadmin’ type time than I need — I like programming and UX design and enjoy doing it in my spare ‘hobby’ time, but sysadmin’ing is more like a necessary evil to me. Heroku works so well and does so much for you.

With a very kind sponsorship gift of $20/month for 6 months from Honeybadger, I used the money to upgrade to a heroku hobby-dev dyno, which does allow SSL on custom hostnames. So now rubyland.news is available at https, via letsencrypt.org, with cert acquisition and renewal fully automated by the letsencrypt-rails-heroku gem, which makes it incredibly painless, just set a few heroku config variables and you’re pretty much done.

I still haven’t redirected all http to https, and am not sure what to do about https on rubyland. For one, if I don’t continue to get sponsorship donations, I might not continue the heroku paid dyno, and then wouldn’t have custom domain SSL available. Also, even with SSL, since the rubyland.news feed often includes embedded <img> tags with their original src, you still get browser mixed-content warnings (which browsers may be moving to give you a security error page on?).  So not sure about the ultimate disposition of SSL on rubyland.news, but for now it’s available on both http and https — so at least I can do secure admin or other logins if I want (haven’t implemented yet, but an admin interface for approving feed suggestions is on my agenda).

Honeybadger

I hadn’t looked at Honeybadger before myself.  I have used bugsnag on client projects before, and been quite happy with it. Honeybadger looks like basically a bugsnag competitor — it’s main feature set is about capturing errors from your Rails (or other, including non-ruby platform) apps, and presenting them well for your response, with grouping, notifications, status disposition, etc.

I’ve set up honeybadger integration on rubyland.news, to check it out. (Note: “Honeybadger is free for non-commercial open-source projects”, which is pretty awesome, thanks honeybadger!) Honeybadger’s feature set and user/developer experience are looking really good.  It’s got much more favorable pricing than bugsnag for many projects–pricing is just per-app, not per-event-logged or per-seat.  It’s got pretty similar featureset to bugsnag, in some areas I like how honeybadger does things a lot better than bugsnag, in others not sure.

(I’ve been thinking for a while about wanting to forward all Rails.logger error-level log lines to my error monitoring service, even though they aren’t fatal exceptions/500s. I think this would be quite do-able with honeybadger, might try to rig it up at some point. I like the idea of being able to put error-level logging in my code rather than monitoring-service-specific logic, and have it just work with whatever monitoring service is configured).

So I’d encourage folks to check out honeybadger — yeah, my attention was caught by their (modest, but welcome and appreciated! $20/month) sponsorship, but I’m not being paid to write this specifically, all they asked for in return for sponsorship was a mention on the rubyland.news about page.

Honeybadger also includes some limited uptime monitoring.   The other important piece of monitoring, in my opinion, is request- or page-load time monitoring, with reports and notifications on median and 90th/95th percentile. I’m not sure if honeybadger includes that in any way. (for non-heroku deploys, disk space, RAM, and CPU usage monitoring is also key. RAM and CPU can still be useful with heroku, but less vital in my experience).

Is there even a service that will work well for Rails apps that combines error, uptime, and request time monitoring, with a great developer experience, at a reasonable price? It’s a bit surprising to me that there are so many services that do just one or two of these, and few that combine all of them in one package.  Anyone had any good experiences?

For my library-sector readers, I think this is one area where most library web infrastruture is not yet operating at professional standards. In this decade, a professional website means you have monitoring and notification to tell you about errors and outages without needing to wait for users to report em, so you can get em fixed as soon as possible. Few library services are being operated such, and it’s time to get up to speed.  While you can run your own monitoring and notification services on your own hardware, in my experience few open source packages are up to the quality of current commercial cloud offerings — and when you run your own monitoring/notification, you run the risk of losing notice of problems because of misconfiguration of some kind (it’s happened to me!), or a local infrastructure event that takes out both your app and your monitoring/notification (that too!).  A cloud commercial offering makes a lot of sense. While there are many “reasonably” priced options these days, they are admittedly still not ‘cheap’ for a library budget (or lack thereof) — but it’s a price worth paying, it’s what i means to run web sites, apps, and services professionally.

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